Fiction: Sinister conspiracy turn night terror children into zombies

By | June 29, 2017

Story plot: Sinister NWO organisation creates death signal that traps ordinary individuals in a night terror state to run a global de-population agenda.

My son had night terrors. Night terror is a sleep disorder that causes feeling of dread. It affects up to 6% of children aged 3-12 and up to 1% of adult population. My son’s symptoms were classic. His terror attacks strike exactly at 1am. He would scream, and trash around. During those screaming and trashing he appeared awake but could not be consoled. He had no recollection on following days. Thankfully his night terrors appear to have gone away some time ago.

Therefore I was not surprised when my three and a half year old daughter started screaming and trashing at night recently. Just the right age for an onset if she has the disorder as well. According to Wikipedia,

There is some evidence that a predisposition to night terrors and other parasomnias may be congenital. Individuals frequently report that past family members have had either episodes of sleep terrors or sleepwalking.

Now the funny thing is at 2.30am, I was woken from my sleep by her screaming. As suddenly, the idea of a zombie story popped into my head. In the morning, it took me like 5 hours to recollect the whole deal because I just couldn’t remember. Let me put it down here.

Sinister NWO meets Zombie Apocalypse meets Freddy Krueger’s Nightmare on Elm Street.

 

Evil scientists create zombies to de-populate Earth

  1. 1% of the human adult population, 6% of the children population may be genetically disposed to night terror.
  2. For some, their night terrors lead to feeding compulsion (not true).
  3. In an evil conspiracy, scientists funded by a sinister organisation that wants to create a new world order build a death ray that broadcasts a frequency in the inaudible wavelength to trap children in their state of night terror.
  4. These living ‘child zombies’ are unable to wake up; driven by a feeding compulsion they are turn into monsters to run a global de-population agenda.
  5. An ordinary couple blessed with two innocent children fight a battle against evil to free their loved ones and save the world!

Love the changes to Pins and Tulumbas with War Robots Update 2.9

By | June 2, 2017

War Robots Update 2.9 changed rocket firing mechanism to Orkan-like simultaneous load-and-fire for Pinatas, Pins and Tulumbas. Works great. Negates Ancile Shield advantage. Makes rocket-armed robot setups like the Russian Death Button Griffin more effective.

 

War Robots Update 2.9 is now available on iOS.

This update is mostly about balance – a number of changes were made to existing weapons including Punisher and Gekko but mostly to rocket type weapons Orkan, Tulumbas, Pins and Pinatas.

I was apprehensive before this update because I am a major rocket user.  I even have some setpiece tactics developed for rocket-armed Griffins – see here my post on ‘Dead City‘. My tactics were working well before the update so from my point of view no news is good news.

This is a screencap of my hangar from late April. As you can see I use 2x Russian ‘Death Button’ Griffins armed with Tulumbas and Pins as well as an Orkan-Rogatka. 2.9 affects me big time.

My hangar - 3 Griffins, 1 Rogatka and 1 Ancilot

My hangar – 3 Griffins, 1 Rogatka and 1 Ancilot

War Robots Update 2.9 changes firing mechanism on Pins, Pinatas and Tulumbas to Orkan-type i.e. load and fire simultaneously. On paper this looks good but if it flopped, it would not be the first one and neither would it be the last.

After a couple of battles last night right after the update however and then some more today, I must say overall feeling was pretty good!

 

My thoughts about the update rocket firing

  1. Robots armed with Pinatas, Pins and Tulumbas are no longer sitting ducks while reloading.
  2. Russian Death Button Griffins now have a new lease of life.
  3. Firing rate while reloading might be slow but it negates a huge advantage Ancile Shields enjoy over rocket-armed robots. This is a tremendous boost in effectiveness and morale against Carnage and Ancilots as well as very fast shield equipped bots like Gareth and Galahad.
  4. Turns out load-and-fire-simultaneously is also pretty good against robots with machine gun types like Punisher. Punisher-armed opponent fires at me tat-tat-tat. I fire back pop-pop-pop. Think of a real life situation. Smug enemy from pillbox fires .50 caliber HMG at you, you fire back with automatic 40mm chain linked grenade launcher. LOL.
  5. There is supposed to be a 15% power up for Orkans. It doesn’t feel powered up at all. Some more testing is probably necessary.

 

Strategies post-Update 2.9

  • I am testing out a Tulumas-armed Rogatka. If Rogatka armed with Orkan is a blitzkrieg-like combo of speed and firepower, a Tulumbas-Rog would look like speedy-nasty with added range. For players who feel that War Robots was moving towards overemphasis on heavy (in a bad way) since the introduction of Lancelot and subsequently the heavy shooting Western bots like Butch, then a Tulumbas-Rog might be a move back towards clever witty play that emphasises movement, penetration and capturing beacons.
  • I am also testing out Galahad with 2x Pins and 1x Tulumbas. Galahad is also extremely fast like Rogatka so this is really about penetration and flanking. Picture stadium at Shenzhen map. Imagine hitting campers from beside and behind.

 

Additional note:

Gekko got buffed again with a 20% power up. This is what Pixonic says

Compared to other “camper” weapons Gekko is a relatively healthy one due to its non-bursty nature. Once Gekko focuses on you, you always have some time to react, either by quickly taking a cover or simply turning around, like: “Alright, definitely not going this way”.

On the flipside, this exact trait turns out to be the Gekko’s greatest weakness. It’s a weapon best suited for suppression, but what’s the point of it your opponent can simply ignore you? You bite like a thousand small lizards… which are taking turns one after another. It’ll probably be a while until these do any significant harm. Now Gekko turns into a slightly larger reptile.

Sounds alright to me except Gekko just had a 15% boost back in Update 2.5. If it enjoys such a power up within a short span, there must be something wrong with it so players are really not adopting it.

 

War Robots tactics: how to deal with shielded, fast-moving bots

By | May 15, 2017

Tactics to deal with shielded robots like Lancelot; leading your shots for jumpers, fast movers like Rogatka. Tactics pretty good up to Expert League. I don’t know what the Champion’s League players are using. War Robots is a game by Pixonic.

 

Ancile Shield versus Thunder: Roll with the punch

What do you do when you encounter a Thunder-Lancelot, a Thunder-Leo or a Thunder-Carnage?

Thunder is a shotgun-like weapon. It’s unfair advantage is deadly firepower at very close range. If you are operating any robot with an Ancile shield, your unfair advantage is your temporary protection against Thunder.

From your adversary’s point of view, he will press his advantage by charging forward for maximum advantage to Thunder.

Your tactic: ‘roll with the punch’ by moving backwards. Maintain if not widen the distance between both bots. This will reduce his unfair advantage while emphasising your own unfair advantage over him.

Note: I have an Ancilot armed with Tarans. It is common to encounter Lancelots armed with Thunder and twin-Orkans. Rolling with the punch works very well. Occasionally I encounter Carnage armed with twin-Thunders bearing down on me. I find that at very close distance, fire from the pair of Tarans cannot focus or converge on a Carnage charging in at high speed. Roll with the punch by backing so that you can fire more accurately. While Thunder-Carnages are frighteningly effective, they can’t take much damage and Taran is the most effective weapon against Carnage.

 

2-0n-1 flanking with any Lancelot/Galahad

What do you do when you encounter robots that are shielded?

Lancelot and Galahad are robots armed with physical shields. These shields protect their frontal arc so the most effective way to attack them is from the rear or flanks.

Lancelot frontal arc

Lancelot frontal arc

In a 1-on-1 encounter especially between two robots of the same kind, it becomes a silly time-wasting ‘who-is-higher-level’ duel. If you have a teammate with you, this is how you can play to put your teammate in a more effective role.

Tactic A: Lancelot adversary charges at your teammate. Move your bot away from your teammate to flank the Lancelot. This is the quickest way to end the match fast – by hitting the non-shielded parts. With some luck, your adversary might even hesitate/get confused/ get disoriented thereby exposing his flanks and rear to both you and your teammate.

Tactic B: Lancelot adversary charges at you. Move your bot so that you pivot your adversary’s flank or rear to your teammate. You sacrifice, teammate gets the sweet end of the deal, battle ends quickly.

Common mistake: 2 players stand side-by-side both hitting the adversary’s frontal arc. This is a time-consuming process that does not guarantee a win.

War Robot tactics for two against shielded adversary

War Robot tactics for two against shielded adversary | U – You, T – Teammate, F – Front, R-Rear

 

Best method to hit jumpers and runners

What is the most effective way to shoot at jumping, fast moving targets?

The Russian Death Button Griffin i.e. 2x Pins & 2 x Tulumbas is my favourite Griffin setup I have two in my hangar. It’s a great support robot that can play an awesome role in Shenzhen, Dead City and Power Plant maps. I have a discussion here on the Dead City.

My favourite type of play is when two of the same robots come together in a battle of wits. This is the kind of play I like best especially in the sniper role – however Russian DB versus Russian DB gives me that feeling as well.

So you encounter a Russian DB looking at you and you are looking at him. He’s waiting to shoot his load and you are ready to empty yours. Best thing to do is to make a feint to make him to jump. Yeah it’s hard to reach him when he’s in the air but he is most vulnerable when he just landed. There is a second or two when he can’t move so if you can anticipate where he is landing, that second or two is just the perfect time for Pins and Tulumbas rockets to fly through the air.

Note: It’s the same way to hit fast bots like Gareth, Stalker or Rogatka. Don’t hit them where they are, hit them where you expect them to be 2 seconds later.

Here is an excellent illustration from Wargaming.net.

Leading your shots to hit moving target

Leading your shots to hit moving target | Credit: Wargaming.net

Tactic: Hit them where you expect them to be, not where they are.

War Robots Moon map strategy 3 opening moves

By | April 27, 2017

War Robots Moon map strategy 3 opening moves: 1. Grab the beacons 2. Intercept/Ambush 3. Meeting engagement in the centre.

War Robots game by Pixonic is now running Update 2.8 since 25 April 2017. I am going to make some observations about it’s key update which is the addition of a Moon map but before I do so, here are the patch notes.

In addition, Pixonic is celebrating 3rd anniversary with an event on 28 April 2017 (tomorrow). Any guesses they are going to launch the new MK II Dash bots exclusively through the event? Like they did for the Western series which till date are still not available with workshop points, Au or even Ag credits.

 

Moon map impressions

My first impressions:

  1. It’s great, battles here are really intense and in my opinion, this is THE map for brawlers. So goodbye to snipers. In fact anything above 500m range is out. 600m Tridents maybe but in my opinion not effective.
  2. The moon map is a maze. There are plenty of corners so line-of-sight fire at medium range and above is tricky.
  3. The walls in between are pretty high – Griffins might be able to manage with it’s Jump ability but Rogatkas – not so much. Even if you jump on to the wall, there are structures that block movement and fire while going over the walls are limited to few places, notably the two ramps one of the left bottom corner the other on the top right corner of the map.
  4. I wrote that it’s intense it really is – one quickly runs out of bots. I have 5 in the hangar but most of the time I get knocked out by the 8th minute mark.

As a testament to it’s intensity and focus on speed and short range play, I captured a grand total of 8 beacons for the first time – on the Moon! Credit to every player – you can see from this screenshot below that the beacon count for everyone is quite very high.

First time I captured 8 beacons - on Moon map

First time I captured 8 beacons – on Moon map

 

This is the hangar that took those 8 beacons.

My hangar - 3 Griffins, 1 Rogatka and 1 Ancilot

My hangar – 3 Griffins, 1 Rogatka and 1 Ancilot

 

Moon map strategies

  1. Grab the beacons
  2. Intercept/ambush!
  3. Meeting engagement in the centre

Thanks to fan kit from wwr.mobi, I have this high-resolution top down view of Moon map.

Moon map top down view; flow of battle

Moon map top down view; flow of battle

 

Based on observations over the past 2 days, this is what I think most players will encounter. The map appears to be in line with Pixonic’s recent emphasis on symmetry in order to create rebalanced conditions for both Blue and Red teams. The map is a mirror image so from either spawn sites, there will be 3 opening moves.

  1. Players playing fast robots such as the buffed Rogatka (speed 60) will be going down green route to grab the first two beacons. I have a level 10 Rogatka – getting Beacon A can be taken for granted, Beacon B is where I run into Red team bots.
  2. Players playing medium speed bots i.e. not fast enough to be first to beacon but not slow pokes like Lancelots have a good chance to do the red route. If you operate Russian Griffins armed with Pins and Tulumbas, this is an ‘intercept/ambush’ play – go up the ramp, hit Red players going to Beacon E with your first salvo.
  3. For the rest of squad white route is the most likely choice. I call this the meeting engagement i.e. head-on clash or more like a traffic congestion for Beacon C. If you take the point, prepare to be ripped to pieces by Red Team. If you follow behind the point man, prepare to be ineffective – you are basically shooting at his back because the tunnel in the centre is quite narrow. Good enough for 2 Lancelots side by side but not much additional space.

 

Rogatka buffed, new look

This is the other major update in 2.8. A new look Rogatka with buff to speed, health and a shorted cool down. I like.

Lastly I am compiling a set of ‘squad rules‘ for new clan members. Please help with your feedback.

New hangar, new strategy for War Robots post-Update 2.6

By | March 25, 2017

A month after Pixonic launched Update 2.6 for War Robots, I am announcing a whole new hangar to the way I play the game – more energy weapons, shorter range for higher firing rate and damage done and then higher speed bots.

 

Old hangar, mixed roles

The robots in my old hangar were:

  • Carnage with 2x Trebuchets
  • 2 units of Griffin with 2x Pins and 2x Tulumbas
  • Griffin with 2x Magnums and 2x Orkans
  • Lancelot with 2x Tarans and 1x Thunder/ sometimes I run a Galahad too

 

Current hangar, knife fighting

The robots in my current hangar are:

  • Carnage with 2x Trebuchets Carnage with 2x Thunders
  • Griffin with 2x Pin and 2x Tulumbas
  • Griffin with 2x Magnums and 2x Orkans
  • Griffin with 2x Magnums and 1x Taran, 1x Orkan
  • Lancelot with 2x Tarans and 1x Thunder Ancilot with 2x Tarans and 1x Ancile Shield

I have to admit that my current hangar is a mish-mash that makes use of whatever weapon is available in the armskote. The difference between current and old hangar is a move entirely towards knife fighting by giving up the sniper role. It’s end of the road for the Treb-Carnage and I don’t intend to start building a Fury or Butch.

 

Intended hangar, knife fighting with more penetration speed

The robots in my intended hangar will be:

  • Carnage with 2x Thunders
  • Griffin with 2x Pin and 2x Tulumbas Rogatka with 2x Orkans
  • Griffin with 2x Magnums and 2x Orkans
  • Griffin with 2x Magnums and 2x Tarans
  • Ancilot with 2x Tarans and 1x Ancile Shield

The intended hangar addresses the main setback in the current hangar which is speed. The fact is Griffins and Lancelots are slow, damned slow. They are bashers, support bots but lacking in penetration speed to totally throw Red Team play out of balance. In bigger maps, they also spend more time getting to a fight than time spent in an actual engagement.

Note: There is an upcoming buff for Rogatka but I don’t have details yet. Could be faster speed and more health. Also there is also an overpowered Dash Mk II in the test server which I will be following keenly. One fast Carnage is not good enough, I want to have 2 if not 3 robots that can move around as fast as Rogatka or Galahad.

 

#1 reason to change – 2-gunned Carnage eclipsed by 3x Fury and 4x Butch

In my opinion the old hangar worked very well for a combination of long range sniping and short range knife work. By the time Update 2.6 was launched, the Sniper Carnage which was already on it’s way to obsolescence when pitted against the 3x Trebuchet Fury became totally eclipsed by the 4x Trebuchet Butch (see analysis of damage done here).

Consider Carnage – a fast, medium robot protected by Ancile Shield.

As a sniper and counter-sniper it did pretty well in the beginning. The Ancile Shield made Nashorn, Kangdae and Zenit counter-fire ineffective. Combined with it’s Rush ability, it could pretty much move between firing spots that made Natasha and Fury clumsy.

Then Pixonic raised the speed of Fury – this was the first step towards obsolescence.

Fury is a three-gunned monster. A single maxed Trebuchet shot from the three-gunned Fury does 3x 17540 or 52620 points of damage. Carnage is a medium robot with a maximum health of 114,000 points. That single shot from Fury takes away 46% of health. 3 shots to kill.

In return, Carnage does 2x 17540 or 35080 points of damage. A maxed Fury has 158,000 points of health. Carnage inflicts 22% damage per shot. 5 shots to kill. The equaliser between Carnage vs. Fury is speed because a skilled player uses this speed to out-move Fury. My personal experience with Fury at the current speed – playing Carnage becomes challenging to difficult.

Butch comes along with 4 Trebuchets and Quickdraw ability. 4 Trebuchets do 4x 17540 or 70160 points or 61% damage in a double tap. Two double-taps from Butch using the Quickdraw ability to kill a maxed Carnage. Game over.

 

#2 reason – Ancilot as a ‘hit-sink’

I wrote here that a Thunder-armed Lancelot has the maximum ‘broadside’ weight to deal with Lancelot to Lancelot engagements. In theory that is still true. In practice I found that a Lancelot due to it’s slow speed just could not ignore it’s surrounding. Before it could fight a 1-on-1 engagement, it had brave everything thrown at it. This is where Ancilots do much better.

After trying out an Ancilot for a month I also realised something else. The value of Ancilot is not just about surviving longer to get to a fight. The fact it is so hard to destroy it is valuable to a squad to have any Ancilot at all. When Red Team has to point every weapon nearby at your Ancilot, your bot is going to die sooner or later – that’s a fact. But if everyone has to take so long and so many hits to destroy you, it gives team mates time and room to move around for some mischief. This is to me, strategic value.

 

#3 reason – Anciles are now fashionable for now

Update 2.6 fixed Ancile shields, you can see the changes here. As a result, battlefields are now overrun with Ancilots, Ancileos (Leo with top mounted Ancile Shield in heavy slot) and Carnages with Thunders. These changes game dynamics in many ways. One of which is the very powerful so-called ‘Russian Death Button’ – Griffin with 2x Pins, 2x Tulumbas – are now also not doing well.

If Anciles become fashionable, then Thunders and Tarans rise to top contender which makes them must-have at the moment.

Dash MK II War Robot going to make number of existing setups obsolete

By | March 6, 2017

War Robot Dash Mk2 if introduced at current prototypes specs will totally displace Carnage, Rogatka, Griffin and Fujin at the mid-range support and ‘Death Button’ role.

New War Robot prototype revealed

Dash MK II is currently a prototype but based on what I saw on Youtube posted by Adrian Chong, I foresee a number of existing setups going obsolete. Hangars will change, players have to part with some AU and based on discussion on some forums, communities, already there is some unhappiness.

 

Functionality and role

Before we look at performance stats, let’s look at the role that this robot is likely to play.

  1. It’s fast.
  2. It has a lot of mobility with the ‘Jump’ ability.
  3. It has 3 medium weapon slots.
  4. It is Ancile Shield protected.
Dash MK II War Robot has Ancile Shield protection

Dash MK II War Robot has Ancile Shield protection | Screencap from video above

 

Based on these features, the most direction comparisons among existing war robots are:

  1. Carnage – Fast and Ancile protected.
  2. Rogatka – Fast and Jump ability.
  3. Griffin – Jump ability and comparable armament i.e. 2 medium and 2 light points on Griffin vs 3 medium on Dash.
  4. Fujin – 3 medium points and Ancile Shield.

I daresay Dash is one up on all four of them based on the current prototype specifications.

  1. Dash will be faster than Carnage (45km/h versus 40km/h).
  2. Dash will have more health than Carnage (150k versus 114k).
  3. Dash will only be slightly slower than Rogatka (45km/h vs 48km/h).
  4. Dash will have more health (Rog has 138k).
  5. Dash is better armed than Rog.
  6. Dash will slightly weaker in health than Griffin (Griffin has 158k).
  7. Dash can also jump.
  8. Dash is as well armed than Griffin.
  9. Dash will be faster than Griffin (45km/h vs 35km/h).
  10. Dash will have higher health than Fujin (150k vs 122k)
  11. Dash will be faster than Fujin (45km/h vs 40km/h)

In other words, Dash is Carnage, Rogatka, Griffin and Fujin rolled into one with only very minor setbacks. As single platform, it can fulfil some roles that these four play and have higher performance than each.

Before After
Carnage with 2x Thunders
(health 114k, speed 40km/h)
Dash with 3x Orkans
(health 150k [+32k], speed 45km/h [+5km/h])
Rogatka with 2x Orkans
Rogatka with 2x Tulumbas
Rogatka with 2x Tarans
(health 138k, speed 48km/h)
Dash with 3x Orkans
Dash with 3x Tulumbas
Dash with 3x Tarans
[health +12k, speed -3km/h]
Griffin with 2x Pinata + 2x Orkans
Griffin with 2x Pin + 2x Tulumbas
Griffin with 2x Magnums + 2x Tarans
(health 158K, speed 35km/h)
Dash with 3x Orkans
Dash with 3x Tulumbas
Dash with 3x Tarans
[health -8k, speed +10km/h]
 Fujin + 3x whatever
(health 122k, speed 40km/h)
Dash with 3x whatever
[health +28k, speed +5km/h]

Safe to the say the only major difference is it won’t be able to climb walls like Fujin but I am saying this sarcastically.

War Robot Dash Mk 2 performance statistics

War Robot Dash Mk 2 performance statistics | Screencap from video above

 

What to do before/after Dash in this current specs is launched

I don’t like to grumble when Pixonic has done a great job providing a free game for mech addicts like me. Everyone has a choice whether to play or not or to make any in-game purchases so no complains with me.

But I think that Dash MK II based on the current prototype is a major blunder. It absolutely shuffles the entire deck of cards for existing players especially early adopters who are at the top of their game. When you shuffle like this, it creates a whole lot of unhappiness.

This is what I would do (action for those who will stick with the game for awhile):

  1. Since Dash outperforms in so many ways, I will be looking to add it to my hangar.
  2. If you are using Carnage/Rogatka/Griffin/Fujin in the ways describe above, stop any upgrading immediately since they will become obsolete soon.
  3. Hang on to your AU or Workshop Points.
  4. I would wait awhile to see how Dash will be made available. If Dash is going to be released only during special events like the Western-bots, I would give it a pass. At the rate that Pixonic is launching new bots, by the time you get hold of Dash or Butch or anyone of the Westerns, good chance they will also be obsolete.
  5. In addition, I see Pins, Pinatas and magnums as outdated. If heavier robots like Dash are going to be the way to go for new models, it is no longer useful to spend any currency at all on light generic weapons. Go for special role weapons like Geckos or Aphids or go for Orkans which require AU to buy and are more powerful and versatile.

 

Additional note:

Although Ancilots (players’ choice of name for 2x Taran + Ancile Shield protected Lancelot) are most commonly used in battering roles and will not be in the quick strike profile like Dash, Dash also has the specs to totally displace Ancilots.

The moment, you put on an Ancile Shield to the Lancelot, it becomes a 2-medium slot robot. Dash has Ancile built in and has one more medium for a lot more fire power than Ancilot.

Ok Dash is weaker with 150k health vs Lancelot at 170k but this player will take the extra firepower and the higher mobility with jump and higher speed (45km/h versus Lancelot 30km/h) any time.

6. Suspend all upgrading on Lancelot and Ancile Shield.

 

War Robots ‘Dead City’ arcs of fire strategy for supporting players

By | March 6, 2017

This is my play strategy for War Robots ‘Dead City’ using Russian Griffins i.e. Griffins setup with 2x Pins and 2x Tulumbas 500m range rockets. This play strategy is also applicable with any robot using the 600m range Trident, 600m range Hydra and 800m range Molot or twin-Molot.

 

Denial of movement, maim or destroy on the flanks

War Robots Dead City Map top view arc of fire Plan A

Dead City Map top view arc of fire Plan A

Look at the Dead City map on top. I took this map off www.mobi. White lines mark 5 beacons in this map. What is notable about this map is the closeness, tight corners and different elevations. Assume a starting position from the right moving towards left.

The map itself is a mirror image so it is likely that both teams will employ similar strategies. Landmarks are:

  • Two flanks top and bottom (or left and right when you first appear at the spawn site).
  • The ‘hollow’ or crater in the centre of the map. The hollow is circled by a rim or a small rise that is slightly above ground level. Look for the rim along the orange circle in the middle.
  • Two corridors, one each between a flank and the centre.
  • The overhead bridge like structure at top left and bottom right corner. Each one has a beacon which makes them an objective in the game but are also favourite positions for snipers or campers. This feature will only be discussed briefly a the end.

Since I am playing with Griffin set up for mid-range support (also applicable to any robots carrying Tridents, Hydra or Molot), this is what I do.

 

Flanks offer clear arc of fire

Russian Griffins are not the best bots to get physical in the centre of the map aka the hollow. In fact they get in the way when team mates operating Lancelots are trying to move in.

Support robots like Russian Griffins are best suited to the two flanks because there is a clear arc of fire. This is where Pins, Tulumbas and Trident work very well.

Look at the yellow arrows. I have tried to draw as close to scale as possible. It means if you look at the bottom yellow arrow for example, a bot standing on the right end of the arrow can fire a salvo at any Red Team member standing at exactly where the beacon is.

Trident will do even better here since an additional 100m in range can cover the entire length wall to wall.

 

The corridors separate the centre and the flanks

There are two corridors on each side of the map. Green arrows mark these two corridors.

These separate the centre and the flanks. They are narrow, unobstructed and are like highways. Any player moving from one flank to the centre also has to cross the corridor running in between. Any player crossing this corridor or moving down it’s length has to brave being hit by any opponent standing at the other end. There is a high chance to be hit just like the flanks.

Because each corridor runs along almost the entire length of the map, this is where the 800m range Molot and possibly Geckos come in. The best kind of robot to put here as a sentinel is a Griffin armed with 2x Molots and 2x twin-Molots, a Patton with 4x Geckos or even a ‘Sniper Lite’ like this Galahad setup. Molot can keep a stream of tungsten ‘pop-pop-pop’ down the corridor.

 

Playing the hollow

The hollow is a crater-like feature in the centre of ‘Dead City’. It’s bowl-shaped with one beacon in the exact centre which is a must-go place. Game developers at Pixonic built in a small feature that makes it difficult for support robots to cover knife-fighting teammates.

Since the hollow is bowl-shaped, the sides or the rim of the bowl are not only elevated from the centre but also slightly higher than ground level. From a standing position, this rim (marked in orange circle) is like a small rise. Attempt to fire from a Griffin standing on ground level into the centre of the hollow and your fire will be blocked by the rise.

Want to help your teammates in the centre, remember to jump before you hit the red button to shoot.

 

Hiding spots first layer

Many players will find themselves at one time or another enjoying the relative safety of many hiding spots available in ‘Dead City’. These are also places where sneaky ‘Death Button’ players like to position themselves.

I have marked some of these on the map below. These ones lie in the ‘first’ layer closest to the hollow.

Since War Robot has not introduced any in-game weapons that can shoot around right corners, this is again where Pins, Tulumbas and Tridents that do a lot of splash damage can shine. And instead of just shooting straight, I found that there are some unexpected clear fields of fire especially to a robot that can jump, like Griffin and Rogatka. 500m/600m range weapons do better at this sort of thing than Pinata or Orkan.

War Robots Dead City Map top view arc of fire Plan B

Dead City Map top view arc of fire Plan B

Don’t just look straight, look left-right from time to time, you might catch some Red Team players showing their backs to you.

 

Hiding spots second layer

These are the additional hiding spots after a team has captured the hollow. By now the balance of the game should be firmly on one side but there can be ‘hidden’ surprises. The good thing here is that rim feature that surrounds the hollow at map centre now provides a elevated shooting position (although it is vulnerable as well).

War Robots Dead City Map top view arc of fire Plan B

Dead City Map top view arc of fire Plan B

For all those players who absolutely hate sniper-campers, this is payback time.

  1. At top left star, the Trebuchet-armed sniper who was standing unmolested on overhead bridge taking shots at everyone from start of game is now vulnerable to fire, just within 500m range from the elevated rim.
  2. At bottom left star, that Fujin or Griffin that was shooting Hydras from safety behind a wall is also now exposed to retribution.

 

Other strategies